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Today, Eurogamer released an article which spoke about numerous aspects of Nintendo’s newest platform, the Nintendo NX. The biggest takeaway from the article is just what exactly is the Nintendo NX? Well, sources told them that the NX will be a high-powered handheld which can plug into a TV docking station. So it’s sort of the handheld/console hybrid that was rumored a while ago, but leaning way more towards the handheld side. The device will feature two detachable controllers, will use cartridges, and is will be less powerful than current-gen hardware.

The future of Nintendo

After the debacle that was the Wii U branding (what is it? Do you need a Wii to use it? Is it more powerful? etc.) Nintendo’s pitch for the NX is a simple one. It’s that you’ll be able to take your games with you on the go. As a high-powered handheld, that makes sense. Also, it’s interesting to note that the controls are attached to either side, and can be detached as two smaller controllers for use in local multiplayer.

One big thing to note is that all of the central processing will be housed inside of the handheld itself. So the rumored TV docking station will not provide any more power, but act more as an external display. The Nintendo NX will also be using cartridge based games (rumoring to house 32 GB), for the platform.

Concept Art on the proposed handheld design (not official)
Concept Art on the proposed handheld design (not official)

What’s powering Nintendo’s future?

Eurogamer goes on to discuss that the Nintendo NX will be using the Nvidia Tegra X1 mobile processors. So to talk in comparison terms, the NX will be more powerful than last-gen’s Xbox 360 and PS3, but will be less powerful than the PlayStation 4. There have been other articles floating around that the platform might use the new, Tegra X2’s, but those rumors have not been substantiated yet.

One of the biggest pieces of news to come out of the article is that Nintendo’s new console won’t support backwards compatibility with older Nintendo games due to the change in processing hardware. This is definitely a different direction for Nintendo who have been pretty generous when it came to backwards compatibility with its previous consoles. Don’t worry though, I’m sure the company will find a way to sell you all those NES games again. 

Finally, we learned that an official unveiling of the NX could take place in September March 2017 launch.

Some thoughts

Okay, while these continue to just be rumors it seems more than likely that this is what Nintendo’s NX is going to end up being. I for one have always found it incredibly interesting to see Nintendo continue to do things “their way” than conforming to the other two console giants.

I do think it’s interesting going forward (especially since there’s no backwards compatibility) seeing the games that Nintendo makes. Because right now all of their studios (and 3rd party) have to develop for different platforms. If anything, I think developers will like this change because they will all be on equal footing making the best possible game for the NX. Meaning the numerous portable developers, will have many more resources when developing their games.

Needless to say, I’m ready for the official unveiling this September. Like most of you, I grew up playing Nintendo, and continue to do so today. Sure, I wish I ended up using my Wii U more, but there were some wonderful experiences on it. Nintendo will continue to do things their way, and I’m excited to see how it unfolds.

So, are you excited for the NX? What are your feelings on a handheld/home console? How excited are you to carry around a little Zelda: Breath of the Wild cartridge in your pocket? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

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Andrew Esposito is a Senior Editor at Victory Point and a lover of all things entertainment. From movies to video games, his passion is unparalleled. He’s written for sites such as What Culture, Gizorama, Pixel Enemy, and runs an entertainment website called Pop Culturally Insensitive. When he’s not playing or writing about movies and video games, Andrew coaches collegiate football.